IN: Inspiration

THE FUTURE IS HERE AND IT’S TAKING THE FORM OF FLIP-FLOPS

Vincent Brinkmann is an exciting New Media artist with a particular interest in creating connections between physical space and the digital realm. His latest endeavour involves looking at the mind-blowing concept of 3D printing.

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Vincent Brinkmann is an exciting New Media artist with a particular interest in creating connections between physical space and the digital realm. For his latest project, he has tapped into the possibilities of 3D printing…

3D printing

Vincent Brinkmann, a German artist who studied Digital Media at the Art Academy in Bremen and New Media Art at the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne, repeatedly looks at the materiality of objects in his work. This preoccupation with the tangibility of existence comes to the fore in his latest project, “Flip-Flops”, which forms part of a larger series titled “Serial 3D printing.”

In recent years, as a result of pioneering work that is set to thoroughly overhaul modern construction methods and product design, 3D printing has progressed in leaps and bounds. In Brinkmann’s case, however, he takes a more nuanced stand that instead involves reflecting on the nature of reproduction.

Flops

Likening 3D printing to a modern version of lithography and photography, Brinkmann sets out to investigate the relationship between original and copy, new and old. Constructing an item entirely from data, so that the original is no longer located in the material world, immediately poses questions that disrupt familiar perceptions of production and the legitimacy of an item. It raises questions of the future of the digital era and the extent to which technology will become an ever-more prevailing force.

Bearing similarities to the ideas of Walter Benjamin in his seminal essay, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” (1936), Brinkmann’s work
places a ritualistic and artistic value on the act of reproduction and mass production. His adoption of the emblematic flip-flop – and a deliberately worn and torn version of the iconic sandals, at that – represents globalisation as well as acting as a multi-layered symbol of Western values.

3d printing

In stark contrast, his use of concrete intends to enforce a sense of permanence and strength that a pliant, plastic and easily discardable flip-flop does not possess.

Read more about Vincent Brinkmann’s work here.

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